Difference between revisions of "How do I wash the bike?"

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You wash a bike almost just like a car....
 
You wash a bike almost just like a car....
  
The biggest difference is that you Never want to use anything that'll put water pressure on a bike. A pressure washer (either the small portables or those found at Car Washes) absolutley Will force water past seals and gaskets.. which means you'll soon be replacing wheel bearings, steering bearings and Maybe an engine. Pressure from just a normal garden hose (nothing on the end, just open) will also be enough to get past the seals on bearings. So, '''only use water from a bucket,''' used with a sponge to wash and rinse. You may want to consider two sponges: one for the bodywork and one for the dirtier, grittier areas.  
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The biggest difference is that you Never want to use anything that'll put water pressure on a bike. A pressure washer (either the small portables or those found at Car Washes) absolutely Will force water past seals and gaskets.. which means you'll soon be replacing {{wikipedia|Wheel_bearing|wheel bearings}}, steering bearings and Maybe an engine. Pressure from just a normal garden hose (nothing on the end, just open) will also be enough to get past the seals on bearings. So, '''only use water from a bucket,''' used with a sponge to wash and rinse. You may want to consider two sponges: one for the bodywork and one for the dirtier, grittier areas.  
  
 
But past that, use the same products for cleaning (NEVER anything other than a 'car soap/shampoo' unless you're planning on replacing the wax) as you'd use on a car. Some way of blowing air (compressor, leaf blower, shop vac) will make getting water out from crevices a lot easier and keep water spots from forming.  
 
But past that, use the same products for cleaning (NEVER anything other than a 'car soap/shampoo' unless you're planning on replacing the wax) as you'd use on a car. Some way of blowing air (compressor, leaf blower, shop vac) will make getting water out from crevices a lot easier and keep water spots from forming.  
  
 
Also, try your best not to get any fluids on the brake pads... Some simple car shampoos can ruin brake pads when left to sit for a few minutes. The chemicals used on brake pads are rather susceptible to other chemicals.
 
Also, try your best not to get any fluids on the brake pads... Some simple car shampoos can ruin brake pads when left to sit for a few minutes. The chemicals used on brake pads are rather susceptible to other chemicals.

Revision as of 15:07, 3 July 2007

You wash a bike almost just like a car....

The biggest difference is that you Never want to use anything that'll put water pressure on a bike. A pressure washer (either the small portables or those found at Car Washes) absolutely Will force water past seals and gaskets.. which means you'll soon be replacing wheel bearings, steering bearings and Maybe an engine. Pressure from just a normal garden hose (nothing on the end, just open) will also be enough to get past the seals on bearings. So, only use water from a bucket, used with a sponge to wash and rinse. You may want to consider two sponges: one for the bodywork and one for the dirtier, grittier areas.

But past that, use the same products for cleaning (NEVER anything other than a 'car soap/shampoo' unless you're planning on replacing the wax) as you'd use on a car. Some way of blowing air (compressor, leaf blower, shop vac) will make getting water out from crevices a lot easier and keep water spots from forming.

Also, try your best not to get any fluids on the brake pads... Some simple car shampoos can ruin brake pads when left to sit for a few minutes. The chemicals used on brake pads are rather susceptible to other chemicals.