Difference between revisions of "Caring for your forks"

From Ninja250Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
 
m
 
(2 intermediate revisions by one other user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[Category:Suspension]]
 
[[Category:Suspension]]
There's really not much that can go wrong with your forks, short of an accident. The #1 threat to them is, in fact, leaking fork seals. This is easily avoided with a little preventative maintenance.  
+
There's really not much that can go wrong with your forks, short of an accident. The #1 threat to them is, in fact, leaking fork seals. This is easily avoided with a little preventive maintenance.  
  
Rock dings are the enemy of your forks. A rock that hits the forks and leaves a mark tends to push the material inwards, just as a meteor hitting the surface of the earth does. That material has to displace somewhere, so it moves out and up. If the bump it leaves is big enough it will take pieces out of your fork seals as they travel up and down. This results in eventual failure. Petrified bug guts can also kill the seals.  
+
Rock dings are the enemy of your forks. A rock that hits the forks and leaves a mark tends to push the material inwards, just as a meteor hitting the surface of the earth does. That material has to displace somewhere, so it moves out and up. If the bump it leaves is big enough, it will take pieces out of your fork seals as they travel up and down. This results in eventual failure. Petrified bug guts can also kill the seals.  
  
 
[[Image:fork seals2-10.JPG|150px]]  
 
[[Image:fork seals2-10.JPG|150px]]  
  
First of all, make a habit of cleaning your forks regularly to remove any road grime/bugs. For the dings, take some 200 grit sandpaper and cut it into strips. Create a cross-hatch (go up & down & round & round) on the entire length of the fork that the oil seal slides over. This will knock down the edges on the rock dings, clean off imperfections, and allow the seals to last longer.  
+
First of all, make a habit of cleaning your forks regularly to remove any road grime/bugs. Extend the forks fully by getting the front wheel [[Supporting Your Bike While Servicing|off the ground]]. For the dings, take some ''2000'' grit sandpaper and cut it into strips. Create a cross-hatch (go up & down & round & round) on the entire length of the fork that the oil seal slides over. This will knock down the edges on the rock dings, clean off imperfections, and allow the seals to last longer.  
  
 
The important part of all this is that there should be no sharp burs from rust that will cut your seals... light scratches will be less damaging to the seals than seriously raised edges.
 
The important part of all this is that there should be no sharp burs from rust that will cut your seals... light scratches will be less damaging to the seals than seriously raised edges.
  
This may sound like harsh treatment, and you WILL see visible scratching. But these scratches don't do anything (negative) to the seals. It is a tried and true method used by all the major suspension service shops. It also did well for Brian on his '87 VFR. 30 sandings in 117,000 miles kept the forks seals in repair and didn't damage anything. This little bit of maintenance can take forks from a state that won't allow them to be used (due to destroying fork seals) and make them usable again.  
+
This may sound like harsh treatment, and you WILL see visible scratching. But these scratches don't do anything (negative) to the seals. It is a tried and true method used by all the major suspension service shops. It also did well for Brian on his '87 VFR. ~30 sandings in 117,000 miles kept the fork seals in repair and didn't damage anything. This little bit of maintenance can take forks from a state that won't allow them to be used (due to destroying fork seals) and make them usable again.  
  
 
Rust or dings high on the forks legs, beyond the area of suspension travel, are cosmetic. You can do what you like with them.  
 
Rust or dings high on the forks legs, beyond the area of suspension travel, are cosmetic. You can do what you like with them.  
  
 
[[Image:fork seals2-9.JPG|150px]]
 
[[Image:fork seals2-9.JPG|150px]]
 +
 +
[[Can I get fork tube protectors/gaiters?|Fork guards]] can help reduce this problem.

Latest revision as of 23:53, 1 December 2017

There's really not much that can go wrong with your forks, short of an accident. The #1 threat to them is, in fact, leaking fork seals. This is easily avoided with a little preventive maintenance.

Rock dings are the enemy of your forks. A rock that hits the forks and leaves a mark tends to push the material inwards, just as a meteor hitting the surface of the earth does. That material has to displace somewhere, so it moves out and up. If the bump it leaves is big enough, it will take pieces out of your fork seals as they travel up and down. This results in eventual failure. Petrified bug guts can also kill the seals.

Fork seals2-10.JPG

First of all, make a habit of cleaning your forks regularly to remove any road grime/bugs. Extend the forks fully by getting the front wheel off the ground. For the dings, take some 2000 grit sandpaper and cut it into strips. Create a cross-hatch (go up & down & round & round) on the entire length of the fork that the oil seal slides over. This will knock down the edges on the rock dings, clean off imperfections, and allow the seals to last longer.

The important part of all this is that there should be no sharp burs from rust that will cut your seals... light scratches will be less damaging to the seals than seriously raised edges.

This may sound like harsh treatment, and you WILL see visible scratching. But these scratches don't do anything (negative) to the seals. It is a tried and true method used by all the major suspension service shops. It also did well for Brian on his '87 VFR. ~30 sandings in 117,000 miles kept the fork seals in repair and didn't damage anything. This little bit of maintenance can take forks from a state that won't allow them to be used (due to destroying fork seals) and make them usable again.

Rust or dings high on the forks legs, beyond the area of suspension travel, are cosmetic. You can do what you like with them.

Fork seals2-9.JPG

Fork guards can help reduce this problem.